Abby's Mix

A verbal mix tape, written by Abby Wood.

Posts by Abby Wood

Five roadshow folk musicians tour, record, and jam in winning film

As published in Berkshire Magazine, May 2016

13103541_1257716920923343_919643714296495932_nTory Hanna is standing barefoot in a brook, pants rolled up, strumming a guitar. “He’s a really talented guy and a great songwriter in his own right,” observes fellow musician David Tanklefsky, “but I think he really shines by allowing everyone else to shine as well.”

As Hanna continues to play and sing, his four friends join in, creating a folksy singalong worthy of the woodland surroundings. This isn’t a backyard jam session, but rather a scene from an award-winning short documentary, Whiskey Treaty Roadshow, about the group by the same name that labels itself as “a collaborative band that brings together five Massachusetts singer-songwriters in the vein of Americana, rock, and roots-folk music.” In just a few years, the impromptu band has also toured the state, released a live album and film, and played a number of big shows. Locals flock whenever the band has a Berkshire gig–one is just around the corner when the fivesome perform at the MASSGathering festival at Great Barrington’s Ski Butternut during Memorial Day weekend.

The band consists of Berkshirites Hanna, Billy Keane, Chris Merenda, and Greg Smith and Cambridge-based Tanklefsky. Ranging in age from late twenties to late thirties, each brings his own dedicated following, which increases their collective local appeal. The group’s passion for music is evident. Real estate, solar development, broadcasting, and even odd jobs are how these men make a living, yet they still make the time to tour and play together. Merenda is the only member that plays music full-time, a fact that garners deep respect from his bandmates.

Despite its brotherly vibe, Whiskey Treaty Roadshow is challenging in concept. How do these band-leading, independent singer-songwriters share a stage without it becoming the ultimate ego contest?

“It’s like a sharing with other artists that you respect,” says Merenda. “You get to see behind the scenes of other songwriters—but the ego is still there, it’s true.”

“We all respect what we’re doing and we all respect what each other is doing,” Keane continues. “We all have a persona, and luckily our personas are all a little bit different. I think that’s why people come to the shows, I think they like seeing somebody doing something that represents themselves among other people doing things that represent themselves, you know.”

When performing together, the group has no clear leader, but instead passes the baton around organically. “Hey Chris,” Keane might say, “how about we hear that song of yours I like so much?” A set list is rarely followed, and each brings his own unique sound: Hanna, the resident crooner, brings the blues, while Merenda is the raucous bluegrass-loving, banjo-picking storyteller. Keane is the audience conversationalist and singalong master, and has an edgy folk sound. Tanklefsky is a sentimental, vivid songwriter that melds 70s country and folk with a touch of pop, and Smith matches Americana guitar and harmonica with warm, raspy vocals. Collectively, they create a rowdy, welcoming dissonance that reverberates around the room and down the street, calling everyone to join the fun.

Whiskey Treaty Roadshow was born out the members playing together at both the Whiskey Treaty Festival, which Hanna and his wife, Susie, put on annually in Greenfield, and a stint of collaborative shows in Brooklyn. The idea was never to create a new band–until someone suggested taking their show on the road. The musicians were inspired by the idea of a traditional roadshow, with acts like jugglers and acrobats all sharing the stage with the common goal of entertainment.

“I had seen a poster of an old Vaudevillian show,” says Keane. “That was the genesis.”

“And the idea of that is actually deeper than a lot of different acts for the audience, it’s people supporting each other,” adds Hanna, noting that the roadshow theme melded perfectly with the cooperative nature of the band.

And so the documentary was born. Susie Hanna was the executive producer and band friend and master marketer Tim Bradley directed the short film that follows the group on a four-day tour throughout the state. With an original score and breathtaking scenery, it’s no wonder the piece, released last year, won hearts and awards at film festivals across the nation.

The Roadshow has achieved a lot in a just a few years, including a live album when it played the finale of the inaugural Shire City Sessions, a free outdoor concert series at Pittsfield’s Shire City Sanctuary.

“I was just really impressed by their collaboration and their whole kind of way of just working together and being really supportive of each other…so I just thought, ‘Wow, what a great fit,’” says Crispina ffrench, Sanctuary owner. “It turned into this amazing, really multiple-faceted collaboration, which was so cool.”

“From there the initiative to turn it into more than a concert and to record it all for a live album and video came from the band,” explains Alan Bauman, owner of CompuWorks and a Sessions organizer/sponsor. “I was more than a little bit enthusiastic about the end result. It was a perfect way to cap a first season.”

The band found the perfect sponsor for their project in Hudson Whiskey of New York, and Darren O’brien of Pittsfield-based Encore Audio to do the sound. On a parking lot stage with a pallet backdrop and twinkling lights strung in every direction, they audio- and video-recorded the entire show.  Heart of the Run, debuted in March at The Bowery Electric in New York City, where shots of whiskey abounded, of course. It is available via digital download and CD on their website, where videos of the entire show can be viewed as well.

Still riding high on that success, the band plans to continue their collaborative efforts, perhaps in a more permanent fashion.

“I think everybody would be really pumped up if this turned into something where we could tour nationally or internationally, and make a go out of it,” says Hanna, “because we feel like what we have to share, what we have to offer, what we’re talking about, it’s worth something….it’s stories, it’s real life, you know?”

View the documentary, purchase the album, and find music videos and additional tour dates at http://www.thewhiskeytreaty.com

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Hello friends!

Old Crow Medicine Show at MASS MoCA, May 29, 2013 [Abby Wood].

Old Crow Medicine Show at MASS MoCA, May 29, 2013 [Abby Wood].

So I have decided, amidst all the craziness of my current life, to once again bring my blog back from the dead. This time for real (maybe).

My big news is that I am attending Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism this fall! I figured now would be a good time to get my entire writing portfolio in one, easy-to-access place. I still have a ways to go before everything is up, but you can view a big chunk of my published work by clicking on the top-right link that says “Portfolio.”

It’s been a really interesting experience going back over all of my previous work, all the way back to high school. There were some amazing moments that I had completely forgotten about, as well as some cringe-worthy ones in some of my earliest work (cliches much?).

It’s clear to me how much my writing has developed over the years, and doing all of this has also made me realize how much I miss regularly writing about music. I’ve gone to multiple concerts in the past year or so with full intentions to write my own reviews (including Lollapalooza, Coldplay, the Lumineers, Wilco, Phish, and, most recently, Old Crow Medicine Show), only to be too strapped for time to do so. While I’ve always told myself I can work a full time job and be the writer I’ve always wanted to be, it’s often just not feasible.

I’m beyond excited for this next chapter of my life, one that will undoubtedly bring with it much more writing. This blog will serve as an outlet to share everything I’m working on in school and — on the off chance I have any free time while earning my Master’s degree — my adventures in the big city.

Now I’m headed to the Solid Sound Festival in North Adams for the weekend…stay tuned for my coverage next week!

Cheers,
Abby

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Hey, remember that time I said I was going to start a blog?


After putting this off for far, far too long, I’ve finally committed myself to getting it up and running. The direction is still somewhat fuzzy, but we can ride it out together. For now I’ll be posting some of my published work, both old and new, reviewing concerts and albums, and maybe doing the occasional interview. I’ll probably throw a few rambling musings and obsessions in there too, just for good measure. A verbal (and visual) mix tape, if you will.

Cheers,
~Abby

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If you’re at all familiar with my musical tastes (read: You’re not because even I’m not familiar with my musical tastes), then you probably know that I’m a sucker for good cover song–the key word here being good. Did you know that “Yesterday” is the most covered song of all time? Why, people, why??

But I digress. Who knew that under all that animal print, big beats, even bigger hair, and ridiculous lyrics that LMFAO had actually produced a rockin’ blues number? I’ve heard this Big Head Todd version on alternative radio a few times, and, no matter how hard I try to resist, always find myself doing some serious window-rolled-down-volume-maxed-out car jamming by the end of the first chorus. Seriously, just try and resist shaking your ass during the “wiggle wiggle wiggle” break. Enjoy!

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BUMMER ALERT: the O.A.R./Barefoot Truth show that was supposed to take place at the Calvin Theater in Northampton, MA, tomorrow night has been postponed until September. This was the first major show I was going to attend since returning to the Berkshires, so I was pretty damn excited.

To tell the truth, I had absolutely no interest in seeing O.A.R. I remember seeing them at SPAC back in 2006, and thinking even then, among the screaming hoards of 14-year-old girls,  that they had become far too poppy; they had crossed the line into bubblegum territory and there was no going back. Don’t get me wrong, it would still be awesome to see them, and I’m sure they would play some fun throwbacks like “Crazy Game of Poker” and “Black Rock,” but I wasn’t about to fork over $40 in hopes that they might.

It wasn’t until I heard that Barefoot Truth was added to the bill that I was convinced to attend. Knowing some of the members personally, I may be a little biased, but I love this band–not only for their music, but for their strong hometown roots and happy-go-lucky attitude towards the music industry.

Sigh, it would have been a fun night. In an attempt to fill the gaping hole of an unfulfilled evening, I’ve gone back in musical time a few months and dug up this concert preview I wrote on the band back in November 2011. Oh BFT, when will you come home again?

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While living in Indianapolis (for a hot minute), I had the pleasure of writing for NUVO, an independent alternative news organization based just north of downtown. Shortly before moving back to the Berkshires, I covered a Herbie Hancock concert for them in Carmel, an affluent suburb of Indy that I described to a friend as “the Lenox of Indianapolis.”

Ironically, it was in Lenox that I saw Hancock for the first time a few years back and wrote this little gem for Berkshire Living. The only problem with having such a funky performer in that type of setting? The type of crowd it attracts isn’t exactly conducive to getting your groove on (if I hadn’t been sitting in a balcony, I would have joined the one woman in the second row who had the courage to get up and shake her thang, despite dirty looks from her neighbors). Oh well, at least he had the wherewithal to repeat my top two favorite Herbie moments: “Chameleon” and plenty of keytar jams. No matter where he plays, and no matter who’s in the crowd, there is no one that can make a keytar look as cool as Herbie Hancock does–just hope he leaves the vocoder at home.

Herbie Hancock, photo by Douglas Kirklan

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